Jim Handman interview postponed again

Due to illness on my part, this evening’s interview has to be postponed again.

Apologies for this second postponement! I’ll be back in touch as soon as possible with a new date in the new year.

Jim Handman interview postponed

The interview with Jim Handman has been postponed to Tuesday December 7 (same time and place).

Hope to see you there!

Toronto Live Interview with Jim Handman

Wednesday December 1 Tuesday December 7, 6:30pm – 8:00pm
Centre for Social Innovation, Room 120 (215 Spadina Ave)
Tickets are free, but please register as space is limited.

As executive producer of CBC’s Quirks & Quarks, Jim Handman is normally behind the scenes. In this interview we’ll get the chance to see what it takes to make one of the world’s top radio science shows, and to find out how it felt to jump into this role with no science background. We’ll also talk about the summer Jim spent teaching journalism in Rwanda, the top things scientists should learn to communicate with the media, and the role of journalism in shaping our world.

Jim will be interviewed by Jen Dodd. Jen is a physicist, designer of public science events including SciBarCamp and Perimeter Institute’s Quantum to Cosmos Festival, and is now managing director of Subtle Technologies, Toronto’s annual festival of art and science.

Location instructions: on arriving at 215 Spadina, go through the Dark Horse cafe to the lobby, go up the stairs to the left of the elevator, and room 120 is through the glass doors straight ahead.

Toronto Live Interview with Dina Graser

Wednesday November 3, 6:30pm – 8:00pm
Centre for Social Innovation, Room 120 (215 Spadina Ave)
Tickets are free, but please register as space is limited: http://guestlistapp.com/events/33717

How do people discover and rediscover their calling in life? November’s interviewee, Dina Graser, is someone who has redefined herself again and again: she has been a lawyer, community activist, political campaigner and arts producer. These days she’s in charge of community relations for Metrolinx, the GTA transit agency. The interview will explore what it means to make Toronto a better place, how to create new institutions and make them work, and what it means to follow your own path in life.

Dina will be interviewed by Jen Dodd. Jen is a physicist, designer of public science events including SciBarCamp and Perimeter Institute’s Quantum to Cosmos Festival, and is now managing director of Subtle Technologies, Toronto’s annual festival of art and science.

Location instructions: on arriving at 215 Spadina, go through the Dark Horse cafe to the lobby, go up the stairs to the left of the elevator, and room 120 is through the glass doors straight ahead.

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Plus….

Coming on Wednesday December 1: Interview with Jim Handman, executive producer of CBC’s Quirks & Quarks

Listen to Karl Schroeder’s interview

The audio recording of my interview with Karl Schroeder (July 20, 2010) is now available for listening:

Enjoy!

Reading list from Karl Schroeder

Thanks to Karl for a fascinating interview! Karl and I have put together a list of the books and articles that were mentioned during the interview.

Karl’s website includes links to all his books, in particular “Lady of Mazes” (2005) and the Virga series (starting with “Sun of Suns” (2006)) which were both mentioned in the interview.

Andy Clark and the theory of the extended mind: “Natural Born Cyborgs” (2003) is probably his best know work; Karl also recommends “Being There” (1997) and his more recent work “Supersizing the Mind: Embodiment, Action, and Cognitive Extension” (2008).

“The Nature of Technology” (2009) by Brian Arthur; contains the idea that technology is a principle of nature that has been harnessed for human use.

“Where Mathematics Comes From” (2000) by George Lakoff and Rafael Nunez, on the idea that mathematics is a language based on metaphors of the human body.

Brian Cantwell Smith’s book “On the Origin of Objects” (1996), where he argues (among other things) that computers don’t do anything sufficiently different to warrant a separate theory.

Ian McDonald’s optimistic visions of the future in “River of Gods” (2004) – about India in 2047 – and “The Dervish House” (2010) – set in Turkey.

Samuel Delaney, “The Jewel-Hinged Jaw” for some good theoretical musings about how science fiction differs from other modes of literature; easiest to find on Google Books.

Mark Angenot is a Canadian social theorist whose analyses closely resemble Delaney’s where SF is concerned.

The Millennium Project and the State of the Future reports can be found here.

Paul Feyeraband, the philosopher of science, wrote an article called “Conquest of Abundance” which Karl mentioned in conjunction with Lady of Mazes.

The remarkable “slam hound” quote was from William Gibson’s 1986 novel “Count Zero”.

Bruno LaTour is the philosopher mentioned by Karl as someone he’s currently reading. For a summary introduction of Latour’s metaphysics, Karl recommends “Prince of Networks: Bruno Latour and Metaphysics” by Graham Harman (2009).

Toronto Live Interview with Karl Schroeder

Tuesday July 20, 6:30pm – 8:00pm
Centre for Social Innovation, Room 120 (215 Spadina Ave)

Tickets are free, but please register as space is limited
Information and registration
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Karl Schroeder is an award-winning science fiction author. He’s a world-builder able to convincingly juxtapose high and low tech. He goes beyond Arthur C Clarke’s idea that “any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic” to understand the worldview, philosophy and economy of people living in these magical possible futures. In his work as a foresight consultant and environmental blogger, he flips these perspectives around to understand how we can make a future we want to live in.

Karl will be interviewed by Jen Dodd. Jen is a physicist, designer of public science events including SciBarCamp and Perimeter Institute’s Quantum to Cosmos Festival, and is now managing director of Subtle Technologies, Toronto’s annual festival of art and science.

Location instructions: on arriving at 215 Spadina, go through the Dark Horse cafe to the lobby, go up the stairs to the left of the elevator, and room 120 is through the glass doors straight ahead.

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